Any alternative response_file for CentOS?


#1

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance, which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#2

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the execute
resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement to
avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance, which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#3

Hi John,

Thanks for your help.

For use of execute resource https://gist.github.com/865637, I’m still
confused how oracle_response_file
answers Oracle installation/configuration questions such as listener port,
system password,…

Could you please give some more details?

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis) <lusis.org+
chef-list@gmail.com> wrote:

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the execute
resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

https://gist.github.com/865637

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

https://gist.github.com/865645

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement to
avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent
http://about.me/lusis

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance, which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and
Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#4

See here:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10500_01/em.920/a96697/rsp.htm

I might have been mistaken but I understood it that you were talking
about using the oracle installer support for a non-interactive
install. (an rsp file).

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:14 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi John,

Thanks for your help.

For use of execute resource https://gist.github.com/865637, I’m still
confused how oracle_response_file
answers Oracle installation/configuration questions such as listener port,
system password,…

Could you please give some more details?

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the execute
resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

https://gist.github.com/865637

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

https://gist.github.com/865645

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement to
avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent
http://about.me/lusis

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance, which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and
Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#5

Sorry for the stupid question.
I didn’t know of Oracle silent installation until you point it out.

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:17 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis) <lusis.org+
chef-list@gmail.com> wrote:

See here:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10500_01/em.920/a96697/rsp.htm

I might have been mistaken but I understood it that you were talking
about using the oracle installer support for a non-interactive
install. (an rsp file).

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:14 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi John,

Thanks for your help.

For use of execute resource https://gist.github.com/865637, I’m still
confused how oracle_response_file
answers Oracle installation/configuration questions such as listener
port,
system password,…

Could you please give some more details?

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the execute
resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

https://gist.github.com/865637

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

https://gist.github.com/865645

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement to
avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent
http://about.me/lusis

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance,
which

requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and
Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#6

You’re confusing the oracle response file with a dpkg preseed file.
The preseed is a feature of the debian package manager resource.

If you wrote an oracle LWRP you could make the oracle response file an
attribute of the resource.

Try something like this:

template “/path/to/responsefile” do
source "oracleresponse.erb"
variables(
:port = “1234”
:password = "1234"
end

execute “install_oracle” do
only_if "some_command_that_checks_for_preconditions"
not_if "some_command_that_checks_for_postconditions"
command "/path/toinstaller some_args /path/to/responsefile"
end

-s

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:26 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Sorry for the stupid question.
I didn’t know of Oracle silent installation until you point it out.

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:17 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

See here:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10500_01/em.920/a96697/rsp.htm

I might have been mistaken but I understood it that you were talking
about using the oracle installer support for a non-interactive
install. (an rsp file).

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:14 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi John,

Thanks for your help.

For use of execute resource https://gist.github.com/865637, I’m still
confused how oracle_response_file
answers Oracle installation/configuration questions such as listener
port,
system password,…

Could you please give some more details?

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the execute
resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

https://gist.github.com/865637

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

https://gist.github.com/865645

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement to
avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent
http://about.me/lusis

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance,
which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian and
Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan


#7

Thanks all.

I came up with something like this

execute “oraclexe-configure” do
command “/etc/init.d/oracle-xe configure < oraclexe_response_file >>
xesilentinstallation.log"
cwd “/tmp/oraclexe"
action :nothing
not_if {File.exists?(”/etc/sysconfig/oracle-xe”)}
end
template “/tmp/oraclexe/oraclexe_response_file” do
source "oraclexe_response_file.erb"
owner "root"
group "root"
mode "0600"
action :create
notifies :run, resources(:execute => “oraclexe-configure”)
end

Thanks

Ryan

On Sat, Mar 12, 2011 at 12:38 AM, Sean OMeara someara@gmail.com wrote:

You’re confusing the oracle response file with a dpkg preseed file.
The preseed is a feature of the debian package manager resource.

If you wrote an oracle LWRP you could make the oracle response file an
attribute of the resource.

Try something like this:

template “/path/to/responsefile” do
source "oracleresponse.erb"
variables(
:port = “1234”
:password = "1234"
end

execute “install_oracle” do
only_if "some_command_that_checks_for_preconditions"
not_if "some_command_that_checks_for_postconditions"
command "/path/toinstaller some_args /path/to/responsefile"
end

-s

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:26 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Sorry for the stupid question.
I didn’t know of Oracle silent installation until you point it out.

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:17 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

See here:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10500_01/em.920/a96697/rsp.htm

I might have been mistaken but I understood it that you were talking
about using the oracle installer support for a non-interactive
install. (an rsp file).

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 5:14 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi John,

Thanks for your help.

For use of execute resource https://gist.github.com/865637, I’m still
confused how oracle_response_file
answers Oracle installation/configuration questions such as listener
port,
system password,…

Could you please give some more details?

Thanks,

Ryan

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:56 PM, John E. Vincent (lusis)
lusis.org+chef-list@gmail.com wrote:

I think you might be confusing the response_file for Oracle with the
dpkg support for response file. It’s been a while since I’ve done an
"automated" Oracle install but you’ll probably want to use the
execute

resource.

Essentially it would be something like this gist:

https://gist.github.com/865637

Note that the idempotence checks (not_if/only_if) are somewhat
limited. You’ll probably want to create an LWRP in the end unless you
can wrap up the determination of a valid oracle install into a single
statement. For example, here’s how we handle creating mysql accounts
for our users:

https://gist.github.com/865645

You can see the hoops I’m jumping through in the ‘not_if’ statement
to

avoid rerunning the work. I really should create a mysql permissions
LWRP.

Hope that helps!

John E. Vincent
http://about.me/lusis

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM, ryan T ryanrobin@gmail.com wrote:

Hi All,

I want to write a recipe to install Oracle on EC2 CentOS instance,
which
requires some interactive input.
Use of response_file seems to meet my need.
Unfortunately, use of a response file is only supported on Debian
and

Ubuntu
at this time - as Opscode wiki says.

Is there any other ways to do this in CentOS?

Thanks,

Ryan