Can I use spiceweasel for admin a localnet services or it is a overkill and


#1

Can I use spiceweasel for admin a localnet services or it is a overkill
and spiceweasel is for deploy applications to production servers in a
cloud for customer ?

I want to describe our network service i an one file, as is in
spiceweasel infrastructure.yml.

And after that I want to manage our servers and virtual containers (lxc)
with spiceweasel separately.

For example:

Create an lxc container1 on server1, bootstrap node with my recipes.

Delete an lxc container2 on server2, remove all about this node from
chef-server

and etc actions, which is needed in real sysadmin life’s

That is managed servers (most of all - virtual containers) and a bare
metal linux servers and developers desktops with ubuntu.

Most of all I planned to use it for manage containers and servers
instead of deplay insrastructure in a cloud.

What do you think ?

On the other hand I know about lxc cookbook and appropriate knife plugin
knife-remotelxc from Heavywater company.

May be this is more useful for my local environment instead of spiceweasel.


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev


#2

Hi Vladimir,

You could do that with Vagrant as well. Vagrant has providers e.g. for
different cloud services, for local vm hosts like virtualbox or vmware or
lxc, but also for managed servers (i.e. bare-metal / no VMs).

The advantage is that you can use the same descriptor (Vagrantfile) and the
same cli tools (vagrant up, etc) for local, cloud and bare metal
deployments.

Works well for simple deployments, e.g. few VMs, no autoscaling, etc…

Cheers,
Torben
On Oct 29, 2013 2:12 PM, “Vladimir Skubriev” skubriev@cvisionlab.com
wrote:

Can I use spiceweasel for admin a localnet services or it is a overkill
and spiceweasel is for deploy applications to production servers in a cloud
for customer ?

I want to describe our network service i an one file, as is in spiceweasel
infrastructure.yml.

And after that I want to manage our servers and virtual containers (lxc)
with spiceweasel separately.

For example:

Create an lxc container1 on server1, bootstrap node with my recipes.

Delete an lxc container2 on server2, remove all about this node from
chef-server

and etc actions, which is needed in real sysadmin life’s

That is managed servers (most of all - virtual containers) and a bare
metal linux servers and developers desktops with ubuntu.

Most of all I planned to use it for manage containers and servers instead
of deplay insrastructure in a cloud.

What do you think ?

On the other hand I know about lxc cookbook and appropriate knife plugin *
knife-remotelxc* from Heavywater company.

May be this is more useful for my local environment instead of spiceweasel.


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev


#3

29.10.2013 21:21, Torben Knerr пишет:

Hi Vladimir,

You could do that with Vagrant as well. Vagrant has providers e.g. for
different cloud services, for local vm hosts like virtualbox or vmware
or lxc, but also for managed servers (i.e. bare-metal / no VMs).

I thought that vagrant is only for testing and development purposes.

Are you use vagrant with other than vbox provider to deploy production
servers ?

Do you think that vagrant is a better tool than lxc cookbook and
knife-lxcremote plugin ?

The advantage is that you can use the same descriptor (Vagrantfile)
and the same cli tools (vagrant up, etc) for local, cloud and bare
metal deployments.

Hmm baremetal is very good. I must read about this.

Works well for simple deployments, e.g. few VMs, no autoscaling, etc…

Of course. Now I interested only in simple deployments.

Cheers,
Torben


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev


#4

On Oct 30, 2013 7:34 AM, “Vladimir Skubriev” skubriev@cvisionlab.com
wrote:

29.10.2013 21:21, Torben Knerr пишет:

Hi Vladimir,

You could do that with Vagrant as well. Vagrant has providers e.g. for
different cloud services, for local vm hosts like virtualbox or vmware or
lxc, but also for managed servers (i.e. bare-metal / no VMs).

I thought that vagrant is only for testing and development purposes.

This is the common perception and was indeed the case with Vagrant 1.0
which would work with VirtualBox only.

Vagrant 1.1+ introduced an extensible plugin architecture, e.g. providers
are just plugins now and there are already lots of them (vbox, vmware, lxc,
aws, rackspace, etc…)

Are you use vagrant with other than vbox provider to deploy production
servers ?

Yes, vagrant-aws for cloud deployments, and vagrant-managed-servers for
deploying to servers which are not VMs (only have ssh access, but can not
destroy or create them)

Do you think that vagrant is a better tool than lxc cookbook and
knife-lxcremote plugin ?

Better depends on the context I guess :slight_smile:

Lxc cookbook sets up lxc. If you want to use the vagrant-lxc provider you
have to set up lxc on your workstation (or wherever you want to run the lxc
containers), and the lxc cookbook sounds perfect for this.

Never used the knife-lxcremote plugin, but I’m working mostly with Chef
Solo so I barely need knife anyways.

The advantage is that you can use the same descriptor (Vagrantfile) and
the same cli tools (vagrant up, etc) for local, cloud and bare metal
deployments.

Hmm baremetal is very good. I must read about this.

Check out the vagrant-managed-servers provider. ‘bare-metal’ is probably
the wrong term, I meant servers which run an OS already and where you have
SSH access to, but no control over their lifecycle (e.g. no create and
destroy as you can do with VMs).

Works well for simple deployments, e.g. few VMs, no autoscaling, etc…

Of course. Now I interested only in simple deployments.

Cheers,
Torben


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev


#5

On Wed, Oct 30, 2013 at 8:22 AM, Torben Knerr ukio@gmx.de wrote:

On Oct 30, 2013 7:34 AM, “Vladimir Skubriev” skubriev@cvisionlab.com
wrote:

29.10.2013 21:21, Torben Knerr пишет:

Hi Vladimir,

You could do that with Vagrant as well. Vagrant has providers e.g. for
different cloud services, for local vm hosts like virtualbox or vmware or
lxc, but also for managed servers (i.e. bare-metal / no VMs).

I thought that vagrant is only for testing and development purposes.

This is the common perception and was indeed the case with Vagrant 1.0
which would work with VirtualBox only.

Vagrant 1.1+ introduced an extensible plugin architecture, e.g. providers
are just plugins now and there are already lots of them (vbox, vmware, lxc,
aws, rackspace, etc…)

Are you use vagrant with other than vbox provider to deploy production
servers ?

Yes, vagrant-aws for cloud deployments, and vagrant-managed-servers for
deploying to servers which are not VMs (only have ssh access, but can not
destroy or create them)

Do you think that vagrant is a better tool than lxc cookbook and
knife-lxcremote plugin ?

Better depends on the context I guess :slight_smile:

Lxc cookbook sets up lxc. If you want to use the vagrant-lxc provider you
have to set up lxc on your workstation (or wherever you want to run the lxc
containers), and the lxc cookbook sounds perfect for this.

Never used the knife-lxcremote plugin, but I’m working mostly with Chef
Solo so I barely need knife anyways.

The advantage is that you can use the same descriptor (Vagrantfile) and
the same cli tools (vagrant up, etc) for local, cloud and bare metal
deployments.

​P.S. forgot to mention: another big advantage is that you can use the rest
of the Vagrant plugin ecosystem​ as well (not just providers) for all these
deployments, e.g. the vagrant-omnibus plugin for installing Chef, the
vagrant-berkshelf plugin, etc…

See here if you are interested in the Vagrant/Berkshelf/Chef Solo workflow
that works for me:
http://opscode.mobi/sympa/arc/chef/2013-10/msg00307.html

Hmm baremetal is very good. I must read about this.

Check out the vagrant-managed-servers provider. ‘bare-metal’ is probably
the wrong term, I meant servers which run an OS already and where you have
SSH access to, but no control over their lifecycle (e.g. no create and
destroy as you can do with VMs).

Works well for simple deployments, e.g. few VMs, no autoscaling, etc…

Of course. Now I interested only in simple deployments.

Cheers,
Torben


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev


#6

30.10.2013 11:22, Torben Knerr пишет:

On Oct 30, 2013 7:34 AM, “Vladimir Skubriev” <skubriev@cvisionlab.com
mailto:skubriev@cvisionlab.com> wrote:

29.10.2013 21:21, Torben Knerr пишет:

Hi Vladimir,

You could do that with Vagrant as well. Vagrant has providers e.g.
for different cloud services, for local vm hosts like virtualbox or
vmware or lxc, but also for managed servers (i.e. bare-metal / no VMs).

I thought that vagrant is only for testing and development purposes.

This is the common perception and was indeed the case with Vagrant 1.0
which would work with VirtualBox only.

Vagrant 1.1+ introduced an extensible plugin architecture, e.g.
providers are just plugins now and there are already lots of them
(vbox, vmware, lxc, aws, rackspace, etc…)

I’m stuck in the past. It is necessary to examine this issue.

Are you use vagrant with other than vbox provider to deploy
production servers ?

Yes, vagrant-aws for cloud deployments, and vagrant-managed-servers
for deploying to servers which are not VMs (only have ssh access, but
can not destroy or create them)

Do you think that vagrant is a better tool than lxc cookbook and
knife-lxcremote plugin ?

Better depends on the context I guess :slight_smile:

It is necessary to try both ways :slight_smile:

Lxc cookbook sets up lxc. If you want to use the vagrant-lxc provider
you have to set up lxc on your workstation (or wherever you want to
run the lxc containers), and the lxc cookbook sounds perfect for this.

Never used the knife-lxcremote plugin, but I’m working mostly with
Chef Solo so I barely need knife anyways.

The advantage is that you can use the same descriptor (Vagrantfile)
and the same cli tools (vagrant up, etc) for local, cloud and bare
metal deployments.

Hmm baremetal is very good. I must read about this.

Check out the vagrant-managed-servers provider. ‘bare-metal’ is
probably the wrong term, I meant servers which run an OS already and
where you have SSH access to, but no control over their lifecycle
(e.g. no create and destroy as you can do with VMs).

I absolutly agree that ‘bare-metal’ is a wrong name for my purposes. :slight_smile:

Thank you for advice


Best regards,

CVision Lab System Administrator
Vladmir Skubriev