Chef-workflow 0.1.0


#1

chef-workflow is a suite of tools which provide a customizable way to manage working with chef. While the -tasklib focuses on the workflow part, the -testlib portion focuses on integration testing. Create a chef server, manage your cookbooks, roles, environments. Even write your own tasks that share data with the rest of the tasks to provide a seamless experience with the rest of the built in stuff. Write tests that exercise whole networks. Yes, really.

Note for those of you who caught my tweet a few weeks ago and dove in, the repositories have moved to their own organization for the release: https://github.com/chef-workflow – I don’t expect this to change again.

The code at this point should be plainly described as beta quality – expect bugs, even though I’ve been using it for the last month or so with reasonable stability.

I’m also whipping up some blog posts to explain the suite in detail, and explain some of the reasoning for some of the approaches. There’s a lot to explain, so I hope those who have interest are patient. :slight_smile: If you want to dive right in, a good chunk of the technical meat is in the README files for the repositories – something I expect to expand on at regular intervals.

Here’s a ditty on integration testing and why it’s important: http://erik.hollensbe.org/2012/12/21/chef-workflow/

-Erik


#2

Hey Erik,

I’ve already sent a couple of pull requests, but I’m still struggling to get the -tasklib gem installed. The reason is that the chef-workflow gem depends on net-ssh ~> 2.6.0, while chef 10.6.2 depends on net-ssh ~> 2.2.2, which creates a conflict.

What’s the recommended way to get around that?

Thanks!

Cassiano Leal

On Friday, December 21, 2012 at 10:19, Erik Hollensbe wrote:

chef-workflow is a suite of tools which provide a customizable way to manage working with chef. While the -tasklib focuses on the workflow part, the -testlib portion focuses on integration testing. Create a chef server, manage your cookbooks, roles, environments. Even write your own tasks that share data with the rest of the tasks to provide a seamless experience with the rest of the built in stuff. Write tests that exercise whole networks. Yes, really.

Note for those of you who caught my tweet a few weeks ago and dove in, the repositories have moved to their own organization for the release: https://github.com/chef-workflow – I don’t expect this to change again.

The code at this point should be plainly described as beta quality – expect bugs, even though I’ve been using it for the last month or so with reasonable stability.

I’m also whipping up some blog posts to explain the suite in detail, and explain some of the reasoning for some of the approaches. There’s a lot to explain, so I hope those who have interest are patient. :slight_smile: If you want to dive right in, a good chunk of the technical meat is in the README files for the repositories – something I expect to expand on at regular intervals.

Here’s a ditty on integration testing and why it’s important: http://erik.hollensbe.org/2012/12/21/chef-workflow/

-Erik


#3

Heh! Yeah, sorry about that; I’ll turn that around in a minute here.


Erik Hollensbe
Sent with Sparrow (http://www.sparrowmailapp.com/?sig)

On Friday, December 21, 2012 at 5:32 AM, Cassiano Leal wrote:

Hey Erik,

I’ve already sent a couple of pull requests, but I’m still struggling to get the -tasklib gem installed. The reason is that the chef-workflow gem depends on net-ssh ~> 2.6.0, while chef 10.6.2 depends on net-ssh ~> 2.2.2, which creates a conflict.

What’s the recommended way to get around that?

Thanks!

Cassiano Leal

On Friday, December 21, 2012 at 10:19, Erik Hollensbe wrote:

chef-workflow is a suite of tools which provide a customizable way to manage working with chef. While the -tasklib focuses on the workflow part, the -testlib portion focuses on integration testing. Create a chef server, manage your cookbooks, roles, environments. Even write your own tasks that share data with the rest of the tasks to provide a seamless experience with the rest of the built in stuff. Write tests that exercise whole networks. Yes, really.

Note for those of you who caught my tweet a few weeks ago and dove in, the repositories have moved to their own organization for the release: https://github.com/chef-workflow – I don’t expect this to change again.

The code at this point should be plainly described as beta quality – expect bugs, even though I’ve been using it for the last month or so with reasonable stability.

I’m also whipping up some blog posts to explain the suite in detail, and explain some of the reasoning for some of the approaches. There’s a lot to explain, so I hope those who have interest are patient. :slight_smile: If you want to dive right in, a good chunk of the technical meat is in the README files for the repositories – something I expect to expand on at regular intervals.

Here’s a ditty on integration testing and why it’s important: http://erik.hollensbe.org/2012/12/21/chef-workflow/

-Erik


#4

Ok, 0.1.1 cut, now with actual working-ness! That’s what I get for trying to release software at 4am.

Thanks for the help!

-Erik

On Dec 21, 2012, at 11:13 AM, Erik Hollensbe erik@hollensbe.org wrote:

Heh! Yeah, sorry about that; I’ll turn that around in a minute here.


Erik Hollensbe
Sent with Sparrow

On Friday, December 21, 2012 at 5:32 AM, Cassiano Leal wrote:

Hey Erik,

I’ve already sent a couple of pull requests, but I’m still struggling to get the -tasklib gem installed. The reason is that the chef-workflow gem depends on net-ssh ~> 2.6.0, while chef 10.6.2 depends on net-ssh ~> 2.2.2, which creates a conflict.

What’s the recommended way to get around that?

Thanks!

Cassiano Leal

On Friday, December 21, 2012 at 10:19, Erik Hollensbe wrote:

chef-workflow is a suite of tools which provide a customizable way to manage working with chef. While the -tasklib focuses on the workflow part, the -testlib portion focuses on integration testing. Create a chef server, manage your cookbooks, roles, environments. Even write your own tasks that share data with the rest of the tasks to provide a seamless experience with the rest of the built in stuff. Write tests that exercise whole networks. Yes, really.

Note for those of you who caught my tweet a few weeks ago and dove in, the repositories have moved to their own organization for the release: https://github.com/chef-workflow – I don’t expect this to change again.

The code at this point should be plainly described as beta quality – expect bugs, even though I’ve been using it for the last month or so with reasonable stability.

I’m also whipping up some blog posts to explain the suite in detail, and explain some of the reasoning for some of the approaches. There’s a lot to explain, so I hope those who have interest are patient. :slight_smile: If you want to dive right in, a good chunk of the technical meat is in the README files for the repositories – something I expect to expand on at regular intervals.

Here’s a ditty on integration testing and why it’s important: http://erik.hollensbe.org/2012/12/21/chef-workflow/

-Erik