Cooking Utensils


#1

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef. What I
don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch of them
mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about tools
related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

  • Berkshelf
  • test-kitchen
  • food-critic
  • many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#2

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need (with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne
stormerider@gmail.comwrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef. What
I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch of
them mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

  • Berkshelf
  • test-kitchen
  • food-critic
  • many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#3

I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:30 PM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com wrote:

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u need
(with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos, local
files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you , additionally
it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne stormerider@gmail.com
wrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef. What
I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch of them
mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

Berkshelf
test-kitchen
food-critic
many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#4

oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:53 AM, Mike miketheman@gmail.com wrote:

I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:30 PM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com wrote:

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u need
(with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos, local
files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally
it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where
you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check
(some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in
the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne <
stormerider@gmail.com>
wrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef.
What

I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch of
them

mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

Berkshelf
test-kitchen
food-critic
many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#5

Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even realize
that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com, www.opscode.com/chef,
cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I never saw a link to
docs.opscode.com before. Looking at it now, is it just me, or is there a
lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little confused as to the
point of each of the two of them, since they both offer documentation and
in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that, but
then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that
there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync.
OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately
(and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the
reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:58 AM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com wrote:

oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:53 AM, Mike miketheman@gmail.com wrote:

I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:30 PM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com wrote:

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need
(with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local
files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally
it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you
tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where
you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check
(some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in
the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne <
stormerider@gmail.com>
wrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef.
What

I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch
of them

mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

Berkshelf
test-kitchen
food-critic
many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

"Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than
we

are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner."

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#6

docs is the new wiki :slight_smile:

Not really because it’s not a wiki, but as I understand it came to life to deprecate the wiki and provide better documentation.

I turn over to docs all the time, it’s great.

  • cassiano

On Monday, May 20, 2013 at 16:24, Morgan Blackthorne wrote:

Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even realize that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com (http://tickets.opscode.com), www.opscode.com/chef (http://www.opscode.com/chef), cookbooks.opscode.com (http://cookbooks.opscode.com), and wiki.opscode.com (http://wiki.opscode.com)… I never saw a link to docs.opscode.com (http://docs.opscode.com) before. Looking at it now, is it just me, or is there a lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little confused as to the point of each of the two of them, since they both offer documentation and in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that, but then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync. OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately (and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:58 AM, Ranjib Dey <dey.ranjib@gmail.com (mailto:dey.ranjib@gmail.com)> wrote:

oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:53 AM, Mike <miketheman@gmail.com (mailto:miketheman@gmail.com)> wrote:

I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:30 PM, Ranjib Dey <dey.ranjib@gmail.com (mailto:dey.ranjib@gmail.com)> wrote:

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u need
(with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos, local
files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you , additionally
it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne <stormerider@gmail.com (mailto:stormerider@gmail.com)>
wrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef. What
I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch of them
mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

Berkshelf
test-kitchen
food-critic
many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would be
awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#7

the wiki is being migrated into docs (iirc)

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Morgan Blackthorne
stormerider@gmail.comwrote:

Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even realize
that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com, www.opscode.com/chef,
cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I never saw a link to
docs.opscode.com before. Looking at it now, is it just me, or is there a
lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little confused as to the
point of each of the two of them, since they both offer documentation and
in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that, but
then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that
there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync.
OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately
(and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the
reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:58 AM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com wrote:

oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 11:53 AM, Mike miketheman@gmail.com wrote:

I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:30 PM, Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
wrote:

berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum)
[i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need
(with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local
files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally
it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you
tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where
you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check
(some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails
in the
list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 10:54 AM, Morgan Blackthorne <
stormerider@gmail.com>
wrote:

I know that there’s a keychain of an ecosystem built up around Chef.
What

I don’t really know is what the various parts are for. I see a bunch
of them

mentioned on the list, on IRC, and occasionally git commits.

Is there, or could there be, a page on the Chef wiki that talks about
tools related to Chef. Off the top of my head, it would include:

Berkshelf
test-kitchen
food-critic
many more that I’m forgetting in my pain and Ambien haze…

Having a short description of what it does and where to get it would
be

awesome.


~~ StormeRider ~~

"Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than
we

are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the
corner."

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS


#8

Yes, docs.opscode.com is replacing the wiki. It is mostly being written
by Opscode’s tech writer, James Scott, who in my opinion is doing an
awesome job (but I’m biased). It’s all also on github, so you can send a
PR if you see something that needs updating or adding:
https://github.com/opscode/chef-docs

If you haven’t seen Learn Chef, be sure to check that out as well

Learn Chef contains tutorials as a compliment to the docs.

  • Mark Mzyk, Opscode Dev

Ranjib Dey mailto:dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 3:36 PM
the wiki is being migrated into docs (iirc)

Morgan Blackthorne mailto:stormerider@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 3:24 PM
Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even
realize that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com
http://tickets.opscode.com, www.opscode.com/chef
http://www.opscode.com/chef, cookbooks.opscode.com
http://cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I never saw a
link to docs.opscode.com http://docs.opscode.com before. Looking at
it now, is it just me, or is there a lot of overlap between it and the
wiki? I’m a little confused as to the point of each of the two of
them, since they both offer documentation and in some cases, document
the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that,
but then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so
that there’s only one place to update and everything would always be
in sync. OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a
lot lately (and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part
of the reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned
about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than
we are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

Ranjib Dey mailto:dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:58 PM
oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

Mike mailto:miketheman@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:53 PM
I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.
Ranjib Dey mailto:dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:30 PM
berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum)
[i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what
cookbooks u need (with version) and from where to get them (chef
servers, git repos, local files etc), it does the grabbing and
assembling part of you , additionally it can also upload all of the
cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you
tests, and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform
(aka operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml)
where you specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check
(some of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails
in the list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib


#9

Chef/Opscode keeps getting better :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 1:07 PM, Mark Mzyk mmzyk@programmersparadox.comwrote:

Yes, docs.opscode.com is replacing the wiki. It is mostly being written
by Opscode’s tech writer, James Scott, who in my opinion is doing an
awesome job (but I’m biased). It’s all also on github, so you can send a PR
if you see something that needs updating or adding:
https://github.com/opscode/chef-docs

If you haven’t seen Learn Chef, be sure to check that out as well
https://learnchef.opscode.com/

Learn Chef contains tutorials as a compliment to the docs.

  • Mark Mzyk, Opscode Dev

    Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:36 PM
    the wiki is being migrated into docs (iirc)

    Morgan Blackthorne stormerider@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:24 PM
    Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even realize
    that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com, www.opscode.com/chef,
    cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I never saw a link to
    docs.opscode.com before. Looking at it now, is it just me, or is there a
    lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little confused as to the
    point of each of the two of them, since they both offer documentation and
    in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that, but
then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that
there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync.
OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately
(and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the
reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:58 PM
oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

Mike miketheman@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:53 PM
I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.
Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:30 PM
berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need (with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in
the list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib


#10

Jason Fox seems to have tried to tackle this in ebook form, though the book
is under construction:

https://leanpub.com/chef-survival-guide?utm_source=hn

Bits of it are on his blog:

Whether you like the workflow or not, it seems to be a pretty good
introduction to the individual components. (The bit on chefspec is as good
a working introduction to writing unit tests for cookbooks as I’ve ever
seen … )

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 1:12 PM, Morgan Blackthorne
stormerider@gmail.comwrote:

Chef/Opscode keeps getting better :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 1:07 PM, Mark Mzyk mmzyk@programmersparadox.comwrote:

Yes, docs.opscode.com is replacing the wiki. It is mostly being written
by Opscode’s tech writer, James Scott, who in my opinion is doing an
awesome job (but I’m biased). It’s all also on github, so you can send a PR
if you see something that needs updating or adding:
https://github.com/opscode/chef-docs

If you haven’t seen Learn Chef, be sure to check that out as well
https://learnchef.opscode.com/

Learn Chef contains tutorials as a compliment to the docs.

  • Mark Mzyk, Opscode Dev

    Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:36 PM
    the wiki is being migrated into docs (iirc)

    Morgan Blackthorne stormerider@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:24 PM
    Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even
    realize that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com,
    www.opscode.com/chef, cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I
    never saw a link to docs.opscode.com before. Looking at it now, is it
    just me, or is there a lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little
    confused as to the point of each of the two of them, since they both offer
    documentation and in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that,
but then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that
there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync.
OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately
(and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the
reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:58 PM
oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

Mike miketheman@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:53 PM
I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.
Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:30 PM
berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need (with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you tests,
and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in
the list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib


#11

Thanks everyone for all the responses. I’m somewhat surprised to find this
as I was dealing with a migraine and insomnia yesterday and didn’t even
remember writing this thread, but this is some pretty invaluable
information. Adding that book to my to-buy list; I’m not sure if our
environment is complex enough to necessitate a CI setup, but I’m curious to
know more about the hows and whys of such a setup before I try making that
decision. And if it makes sense to move forward with, doing so sooner than
later will inevitably be easier.

I also find it somewhat amusing that the Opscode doc site can be acronymed
as “d.o.c” :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 2:57 PM, steve . leftathome@gmail.com wrote:

Jason Fox seems to have tried to tackle this in ebook form, though the
book is under construction:

https://leanpub.com/chef-survival-guide?utm_source=hn

Bits of it are on his blog:

http://neverstopbuilding.net/blog/categories/chef-broiler-plate/

Whether you like the workflow or not, it seems to be a pretty good
introduction to the individual components. (The bit on chefspec is as good
a working introduction to writing unit tests for cookbooks as I’ve ever
seen … )

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 1:12 PM, Morgan Blackthorne <stormerider@gmail.com

wrote:

Chef/Opscode keeps getting better :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 1:07 PM, Mark Mzyk mmzyk@programmersparadox.comwrote:

Yes, docs.opscode.com is replacing the wiki. It is mostly being written
by Opscode’s tech writer, James Scott, who in my opinion is doing an
awesome job (but I’m biased). It’s all also on github, so you can send a PR
if you see something that needs updating or adding:
https://github.com/opscode/chef-docs

If you haven’t seen Learn Chef, be sure to check that out as well
https://learnchef.opscode.com/

Learn Chef contains tutorials as a compliment to the docs.

  • Mark Mzyk, Opscode Dev

    Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:36 PM
    the wiki is being migrated into docs (iirc)

    Morgan Blackthorne stormerider@gmail.com
    May 20, 2013 3:24 PM
    Aha, yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for. And I didn’t even
    realize that site existed-- I’ve seen tickets.opscode.com,
    www.opscode.com/chef, cookbooks.opscode.com, and wiki.opscode.com… I
    never saw a link to docs.opscode.com before. Looking at it now, is it
    just me, or is there a lot of overlap between it and the wiki? I’m a little
    confused as to the point of each of the two of them, since they both offer
    documentation and in some cases, document the same exact thing.

If d.o.c is more of an API-level documentation, then I could see that,
but then I’d wonder if that could then be embedded into the wiki so that
there’s only one place to update and everything would always be in sync.
OTOH, I know the Opscode folks have been revamping the site a lot lately
(and I’m liking the new themes, btw!) so maybe this is part of the
reorganization and duplication isn’t something to be concerned about :slight_smile:


~~ StormeRider ~~

“Every world needs its heroes […] They inspire us to be better than we
are. And they protect from the darkness that’s just around the corner.”

(from Smallville Season 6x1: “Zod”)

On why I hate the phrase “that’s so lame”… http://bit.ly/Ps3uSS

Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:58 PM
oh… sorry
home page of the doc categorized and enlists most of them, workflows
tools, knife plugins, and many more.

http://docs.opscode.com/

e.g. chef community -> development tools

does this answer the question ?

Mike miketheman@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:53 PM
I think Morgan is asking for people to list their toolset, not explain
the ones referenced.

More of: “I use these tools in this manner” kind of thing.
Ranjib Dey dey.ranjib@gmail.com
May 20, 2013 2:30 PM
berkshelf - think of this as bundler or a package manager (like yum) [i know oversimplified]. It reads a file where you describe what cookbooks u
need (with version) and from where to get them (chef servers, git repos,
local files etc), it does the grabbing and assembling part of you ,
additionally it can also upload all of the cookbooks to a chef server.
test-kitchen - an integration testing framework. You can write you
tests, and then use test-kitchen to run them against multiple platform (aka
operating system). Test kitchen also reads a file (.kitech.yaml) where you
specify what to run in each platform etc.

foodcritic - a lint tool. which check common styling errors against a
predefined set of rules. this is not testing but more of style check (some
of the checks strongly suggest there is a bug).

i think chef-docs has a glossary … if plase feel free to drop mails in
the list, this will also serve as feedback for the docsite,
ranjib